Forums    General Discussions    Snow chains ... Drive safer in winter:
Go to...
Start A New Topic
Search
Notify
Tools
Reply To This Topic
  
Snow chains ... Drive safer in winter:
 Login now/Join our community
 
Picture of Doug Smiley
posted
https://www.doityourselfrv.com...hains-vs-snow-socks/

Thinking about doing some winter camping???

...in the United States, there are 11 states that require that you carry/use chains:

California
Colorado
Idaho
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
Oregon
South Dakota
Utah
Washington
Wyoming

In Canada, there are some provinces which require chains
and some that recommend them.
In some provinces, there are requirements that state you must have winter tires on your vehicle and trailer during certain months of the year.

For example, the transportation laws in Oregon require that chains be placed on one tire on either side of one axle on trailers with brakes.
For medium duty vehicles (such as RVs or buses), there must be chains on one tire on each side of the drive axle.
If you are towing a trailer behind your RV or bus, you must also have chains on the trailer.


_________________________

The 82 MCC {by Barth}
is not an rv--
it is a Motor Coach!!
www.amway.ca/dougsmiley

 
Posts: 2992 | Location: Nova Scotia | Member Since: 12-08-2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 1/19
Picture of Steve VW
posted Hide Post
Many years ago, growing up in the UP of Michigan, I lived where we had both steep hills and lots of snow. Sometimes the snow was so deep most could not get through. You had to go the long way around and go down the steep hills, dragging on the snow banks all the way.

We had a 1958 4WD Willys Jeep station wagon with a flathead straight six engine. Low powered but good torque. (COOL old car, wish I still had one) It was a great snow car, better than most. 2-3 feet of snow and it pushed a road. When the Jeep couldn't get through we put chains on the front two wheels, aiding both steering and drive traction. (also, more weight on the fronts) It would climb a wall and it could push through snow that was over the hood.

We never started out with chains. If we knew we'd need them we didn't go. When we found ourselves in a situation where they were needed, they bailed us out. Only got stuck once, but we had a hand winch and some long chains. 2 hours of digging (we had shovels) and winching we got it out...

If you need chains you are a fool in way over your head. They are hard to install, can be driven only below 30 mph. If you put yourself in a situation where you actually need them, PULL OVER.

Other than poorly planned emergencies I would never drive an RV where chains are actually needed. That said, I have driven my coaches over level snow covered roads. Light snow, not over 45 mph. I have found the coach actually has pretty good traction. The weight on the rear tires coupled with low power made drive traction good. I have tried to spin the rears from a stop and could not do it. (Exception: after I installed the 400 hp 454HO in the 86, it would spin 'em...)

Front tires another story. Sharp turns or heavy braking ain't happenin'. If you steer straight, don't panic, they will work as well as a car.

If you can't drive without chains, you shouldn't be driving, even with them.

Think about it....


9708-M0037-37MM-01
"98" Monarch 37
Spartan MM, 6 spd Allison
Cummins 8.3 300 hp
 
Posts: 4316 | Location: Kalkaska, MI | Member Since: 02-04-2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/18
Picture of Duane88
posted Hide Post
I agree Steve, deep snow and ice, steep grades means stay home. Hot Toddies and fireplaces prevail!!

I remember my Dad using chains, but we lived in Illinois and it was mostly on flat terrain, no snow tires.


25 Ft Glassnose, 2792, 1982
454 Engine
Plain Jane Interior
Original Paint
Picture by Kevin
 
Posts: 1345 | Location: Clinton Iowa | Member Since: 04-02-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/10
Picture of ccctimtation
posted Hide Post
Duane, chances are your Dad's tires were the predominant 6.70x15s, old time belts, could be cotton or new tech rayon or nylon. By the time of "You go or we pay the tow." Proliferation of sizes was rampant as was tax dollars spent on plowing and salting.


If your not Royal don't get Coronated!
 
Posts: 949 | Location: St. Charles, MO, USA | Member Since: 10-09-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/18
Picture of Duane88
posted Hide Post
Geez; going back a long way, the car I remember chains on mostly was a 47 Chevy with 3 on the tree vacuum assisted. We did not have a lot of money so I suppose the tires were close to bald or at best not new. I remember a lot of flat tires on trips south to visit the Grand Parents. The chains came out often on the Christmas trips either down or return.


25 Ft Glassnose, 2792, 1982
454 Engine
Plain Jane Interior
Original Paint
Picture by Kevin
 
Posts: 1345 | Location: Clinton Iowa | Member Since: 04-02-2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

    Forums    General Discussions    Snow chains ... Drive safer in winter:

This website is dedicated to the Barth Custom Coach, their owners and those who admire this American made, quality crafted, motor coach.
We are committed to the history, preservation and restoration of the Barth Custom Coach.