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Why I Don't Like Molded Plugs/Sockets
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Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 9/09
Picture of Lance Walton
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Something someone said in these postings has me wondering. Last year when I was massively refurbishing my Regency I replaced all of the duplex receptacles. I also checked, and cleaned as necessary, all connections inside the AC panel and the disconnects just outside the panel. I actually replaced two of the disconnects that were in less than good condition. I am currently using two 1500 watt heaters on separate circuits. The two units are brand new. They are both located in locations so as to minimize the potential of overheating anything.

My question is, am I risking a fire?


Lance & Sue Walton
1993 38ft Regency
Cummins 6CTA8.3 300HP
Allison MD3060 Transmission
Spartan Chassis
Titusville, FL
 
Posts: 245 | Location: Titusville, FL | Member Since: 06-21-2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/10
Picture of Bones
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I am a fan of Qwik-Lok connectors. One of the best features being that after you wrap the stripped conductor around the screw, there is a solder lug for the end of the conductor. I like the idea that the copper strands are all contained that way. This solves the issue Bill pointed out about tip dipping wires and less surface area making contact.

Scroll down and play the demo to see how it works.

http://qwiklok.com/

The plug has a real positive engagement and the cord restraint is very well designed. Too bad they only make a 120-15A version but they do make a hospital grade connector. The only maintence I've done is a shot of DeoxIT from time to time.


Regal 25 built in 1989
1985 P-30 chassis
454 TH400
 
Posts: 215 | Location: Somewhere in the SW | Member Since: 03-06-2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
First Month Member
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 11/13
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quote:
Originally posted by Lance Walton:
Something someone said in these postings has me wondering. Last year when I was massively refurbishing my Regency I replaced all of the duplex receptacles.


If they were high quality ones, that is better. The cheapie imports are not nearly as good.

quote:
I am currently using two 1500 watt heaters on separate circuits. The two units are brand new. They are both located in locations so as to minimize the potential of overheating anything.

My question is, am I risking a fire?


It sounds like you are doing everything right. The only thing I can say is caution is always good. Check plug/receptacle heat after long use. A sniff test at the receptacle will also give advance warning of a problem.

Checking the outside post plug and receptacle is also good, although this would be more of an issue with the lighter 30 amp cords than with your 50 amp cord.

I tend to be extra cautious, and will not sleep with any heat on, period. That is what down comforters were made for. If you do use heaters for sleeping, I would recommend a lower than 1500 watt settings.


.

84 30T PeeThirty-Something, 502 powered
 
Posts: 7397 | Location: AZ Central Highlands | Member Since: 01-09-2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
First Month Member
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 11/13
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quote:
Originally posted by Bones:
I am a fan of Qwik-Lok connectors.

http://qwiklok.com/


Great link. I wish I knew about that several years ago.



quote:
The only maintence I've done is a shot of DeoxIT from time to time.


Great product. At work, I purchased my own to make my job easier. I can't tell you how many planes left on time because it made this or that cockpit switch start working again with either . Many of those were devilishly tricky and time-consuming to replace. If we had them in stock. No Ox is good, too. Both are used by model railroaders, and lively discussions ensue when favorites are discussed. Smiler


.

84 30T PeeThirty-Something, 502 powered
 
Posts: 7397 | Location: AZ Central Highlands | Member Since: 01-09-2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 10/08
Picture of MWrench
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I have been really surprised what RV manufacturers use for AC distribution and connections. Most of the outlets are the type that the wire is stripped and pushed into a hole that has two pieces of metal that scrape against the wire and fashioned so the wire cannot be pulled out easily. BUT, the actual contact area is minimal. Further, most RV manufacturers use those inline snap connectors for speed of construction. A?/C distribution panels for example is fabricated ahead of time and when mated to the body of the coach, wires are just connected via these connectors. These connectors use an insulation displacement system so that all they have to do is just place the wires in the slot and bare down on them. AGAIN contact area is limited to the sharp edges that cut thru the insulation and touch the wire below the insulation. Unfortunately, BARTH is no different. When I rewired my A/C distribution system for the new inverter/charger, I took out all of those in line snap connectors and wired directly to the breaker panel.

What really surprised me was that the A/C and microwave used the same system AND there was obvious heating in those snap connectors as they were blackened. 20 amps thru these ahhh NO!

After I completed the inverter/charger, I went back and changed out all of the duplex outlets to 20 amp capacity duplex (even thou the breakers are 15 amp)and used screw connections only. I could really tell the difference in the plug insertion force between the original and replacement duplex outlets. On one of the original duplex outlets that I removed from the kitchen area (15 amp breaker on this line) one of the wires was discolored where it was making contact inside the housing. Probably someone had used a space heater on this and was heating up where the connection was not adequate.



Inverter/charger installation


Ed
94 30' Breakaway #3864
30-BS-6B side entry
230 Cummins, Allison 6 speed
Spartan chassis
K9DVC
 
Posts: 1893 | Location: Los Gatos, CA | Member Since: 12-08-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/10
Picture of Bones
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Yet another question answered. I saw those connectors all over my coach and didn't know what they were. I haven't started digging into the AC circuits yet since everything is working at this point.

So they are like giant Scotch-locks?


Regal 25 built in 1989
1985 P-30 chassis
454 TH400
 
Posts: 215 | Location: Somewhere in the SW | Member Since: 03-06-2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
First Month Member
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 11/13
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quote:
Originally posted by Bones:


So they are like giant Scotch-locks?


Golly I hope they are better than that.

Haven't seen any on mine.

I believe Scotch Locks are the lousiest product ever put on the market by a good company. Before learning the hard way, I used to use them, and they caused me a lot of grief before I wised up.

I see them used on boat trailers, motorcycles, all sorts of places where moisture or salt air can degrade the connection.


.

84 30T PeeThirty-Something, 502 powered
 
Posts: 7397 | Location: AZ Central Highlands | Member Since: 01-09-2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 8/16
Picture of Bill N.Y.
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quote:
Originally posted by bill h:
I believe Scotch Locks are the lousiest product ever put on the market by a good company.
100% agree - I do not use Scotch Locks.

Here is a writeup I did back in 2006: Failed wiring and how to protect against it. FYI...


˙ʎ˙u ןןıq- „ǝןƃuɐ ʇuǝɹǝɟɟıp ɐ ɯoɹɟ pןɹoʍ ǝɥʇ ʇɐ ʞooן ɐ ƃuıʞɐʇ sı ǝɟıן oʇ ʇǝɹɔǝs ǝɥʇ„

Regis Widebody1990 Barth Regis Widebody
8908 0128 40RDS-C1
L-10 Cummins
Allison MT647 Transmission
Spartan Chassis
Regal Conversion1991 Medical Lab Conversion
9102 3709 33S-12
Ford 460 MPFI
C6 Transmission
Oshkosh Chassis



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Posts: 7289 | Location: Newburgh, New York | Member Since: 05-10-2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 12/10
Picture of Bones
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From Ed's description, ScotchLock was the first thing that came to mind. I have enough experience with Scotch Locks to know to NEVER use them.

For my 12vdc needs, it is Weather Pack connectors all the way. I have never had one fail. Dealing with 70's and 80's era Japanese motorcycles, one learns quick to start replacing bullet connectors right away if they want to get home.

I guess those AC connectors will be added to the list of things to at least inspect if not replace. Like I said, I have no current issues with AC circuits, of course my gremlin bell might be working overtime.


Regal 25 built in 1989
1985 P-30 chassis
454 TH400
 
Posts: 215 | Location: Somewhere in the SW | Member Since: 03-06-2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 1/11
Picture of lenny and judy
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I did not go to M.I.T. where are all the red wires? merry Christmas. I am sick in bed and still can use the computer.
lenny


lenny and judy
32', Regency, Cummins 8.3L, Spartan Chassis, 1992
Tag# 9112 0158 32RS 1B
 
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    Forums    Tech Talk    Why I Don't Like Molded Plugs/Sockets

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