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    Forums    Tech Talk    How NOT to replace trim rivets... redoing IDIOT'S work
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How NOT to replace trim rivets... redoing IDIOT'S work
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Hello All,

As a disclaimer, I'm definitely not an expert in fastening with rivets, however, we do use a lot of them in our business & I have lodged at a Holiday Inn. That said, when we have difficulty in getting a standard pop rivet to grip the substrate we usually substitute a tri-fold "exploding" rivet in its place. We inventory two types (there may be more); low-profile flat-head (tri-fold) as well as the shaved-head (tri-fold) rivet. The low profile flat-head is similar to the standard rivet & the shaved-head which stands more proud of the surface is solid. If you're fortunate, the shaved-head mandrel will snap off near the head and can be trimmed VERY CAREFULLY with a small file and sandpaper. For the shaved-head style which looks solid when installed, unlike a pop rivet, they make a trimmer which does a quick and efficient job, however, the trimmer is rather expensive for occasional use.

Lastly, we buy many of our rivets from Albany County Fasteners. They have a rather comprehensive website which lists a plethora of size, shape, style, & material available. This source may be helpful for future needs.

Good Luck,

John
 
Posts: 14 | Location: Central Pa. | Member Since: 03-24-2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com 8/19
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Goodsign,

The rivets you suggest sound impressive. The price is expensive. I did not notice the mandrel material. It needs to be aluminum also. Steel and aluminum do not co-exist together.
I found trifold with a better price, all aluminum. You can search member Tom and Julie to see the problems Tom had with steel mandrel rivets if I recall correctly.
 
Posts: 4040 | Location: Ohio | Member Since: 07-29-2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Goodsign and Kevin, thank you for the information about those rivets. I will definitely be making use of your ideas.

Matt
 
Posts: 457 | Location: Massachusetts | Member Since: 07-28-2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Official Barth Junkie
Supporting Member of Barthmobile.com1/21
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It is interesting that we are seeing the realtime service life of the rivets as they finally fail on our coaches.

There have been numerous complaints about Barth's use of steel mandrel rivets. While they are initially stronger than the aluminum mandrel versions, there is inevitable corrosion of the mandrel which leads to the failure of the rivets, as we have seen. That said, they seem to last about 25 years.

I suspect they were probably cheaper and readily available when Barth was assembling the coaches. These rivets, and the square steel framing used on the basement frames, were both unfortunate choices for the long run. Had Barth used all aluminum, the coaches would last almost forever. OTOH, they do last 25 years.... hmm

As for the side belt rivets, it probably doesn't matter much what you use. (we now know steel mandrels last about 25 yrs, aluminum longer) Original rivets were not blind closed end either. Considering the side trim rivets are covered by the trim strip, I used standard cheap aluminum rivets. Under the trim, head style is not important either.

As we are seeing, particularly in the Monarch series, it is probably wise to inspect these rivets if you have not. Many are failing. Replace rivets before they leave you hanging!

Have Barth, will rivet Mechanic


9708-M0037-37MM-01
"98" Monarch 37
Spartan MM, 6 spd Allison
Cummins 8.3 300 hp
 
Posts: 4761 | Location: Kalkaska, MI | Member Since: 02-04-2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This has been a riveting thread!

Sorry

They trashed Steve’s trim. Mine they did well. But the $64000 dollar question is when did they make those repairs? I’ve had Midnight for almost 4 years. That makes my repairs at 20 years at the longest. I believe Morris would have mentioned if it was recent history. So less than 20 years some rivet work was done to mine. So many questions so few answers.


Dana & Lynn
1997 38ft Monarch front entry
Spartan Mountain Master Chassis
Cummins 8.3 325hp
Allison MD-3060 6 speed
22.5 11R
Cummins Factory Exhaust Brake
8000 watt Quiet Diesel Generator
9608-M0022-38MI-4C
Christened Midnight

1972 22ft
Christened Camp Barth
 
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Hanson Rivets is another source. We had done some repair work on Old Blue before painting the upper white area just below the roof line. There was some seal removal & replacement of rivets around the brow corners that were made of fiberglass. That required 1/4" rivets & a 1/4" rivet tool. After doing our research we bought bulk rivets from Hanson.


Jim and TereJim and Tere

1985 Regal
29' Chevy 454 P32
8411 3172 29FP3B
Gear Vendor 6 Speed Tranny
 
Posts: 3921 | Location: madisonville tn usa | Member Since: 02-19-2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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    Forums    Tech Talk    How NOT to replace trim rivets... redoing IDIOT'S work

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